Here's the Mt. Gox catalyst Bitcoin needs to watch out for ...

BitcoinMeister - The 1 Bitcoin Show- Bloomberg's Mt. Gox crypto-noise, Coinbase, an easy is it your BTC test

BitcoinMeister - The 1 Bitcoin Show- Bloomberg's Mt. Gox crypto-noise, Coinbase, an easy is it your BTC test submitted by Yanlii to cryptovideos [link] [comments]

Bloomberg Businessweek: The Fight Over Mt. Goxs Bitcoin Stash

Bloomberg Businessweek: The Fight Over Mt. Goxs Bitcoin Stash submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Mt.Gox Bloomberg Interview with Karpeles: Seeing Huge Increase in Bitcoin Customers

Mt.Gox Bloomberg Interview with Karpeles: Seeing Huge Increase in Bitcoin Customers submitted by smeggletoot to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/mzzK67PkcV

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/mzzK67PkcV submitted by jeff98379 to newstweetfeed [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: [Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/mZdqdT2T0J /r/newstweetfeed

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: [Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/mZdqdT2T0J /newstweetfeed submitted by HiIAMCaptainObvious to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/bHZ0o75VQn

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/bHZ0o75VQn submitted by jeff98379 to newstweetfeed [link] [comments]

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/fnLdZZsX0A

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/fnLdZZsX0A submitted by jeff98379 to newstweetfeed [link] [comments]

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/dz1P1FXN6g

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/dz1P1FXN6g submitted by jeff98379 to newstweetfeed [link] [comments]

[Bloomberg Business] RT @crypto: The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer https://t.co/bjEvQVLZHL h…

[Bloomberg Business] RT @crypto: The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer https://t.co/bjEvQVLZHL h… submitted by jeff98379 to newstweetfeed [link] [comments]

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he is no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/UyyqfsThXV

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he is no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/UyyqfsThXV submitted by jeff98379 to newstweetfeed [link] [comments]

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/pjQHc6VJ8h

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/pjQHc6VJ8h submitted by jeff98379 to newstweetfeed [link] [comments]

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/mZdqdT2T0J

[Bloomberg Business] The former CEO of the once-largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, says he no longer is a Bitcoin believer… https://t.co/mZdqdT2T0J submitted by jeff98379 to newstweetfeed [link] [comments]

Can Mt. Gox Failure Be a Positive for Bitcoin? [Jeremy Allaire, Circle on Bloomberg]

Can Mt. Gox Failure Be a Positive for Bitcoin? [Jeremy Allaire, Circle on Bloomberg] submitted by dexX7 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Daily Crypto Brief for Friday, June 12, 2020.

This is your ITB Media Daily Crypto Brief for Friday, June 12, 2020.

In Mainstream Financial News.
CNBC reports: Goldman Sachs unintentionally sparked a war with cryptocurrency evangelists - https://cnb.cx/3cNxNG6
Goldman Sachs unintentionally sparked a war with cryptocurrency evangelists. “Cryptocurrencies including bitcoin are not an asset class,” Goldman Sachs declared in a slide deck released ahead of an investor call on Wednesday.
Bloomberg Headline: Quadriga Downfall Stemmed From Founder’s Fraud, Regulators Find - https://bloom.bg/2AmzFsm
The Canadian securities regulator has taken the rare step of publishing its findings on its 10-month investigation into QuadrigaCX, whose collapse in 2019 caused at least C$169 million ($125 million) in losses for 76,000 investors in Canada and abroad. QuadrigaCX shut down in January 2019, weeks after Cotten died unexpected while on his honeymoon in India, leaving behind a mystery of what happened to the Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies on the platform.
The Asia Times Reports: Why India could be the next crypto hub https://bit.ly/3cUCRZn
Here are four key forces driving crypto adoption in India:
Currency fluctuations and mismanagement
Scale
Legalisation and regulation
Huge domestic and foreign remittances
Wall Street Journal Headline: Cyber Daily: Oversight of Cryptocurrency and Other Financial Technology Is Evolving - https://on.wsj.com/3dNMKZT
Oversight of Cryptocurrency and Other Financial Technology Is Evolving. Good day. ... Hackers attacking cryptocurrency exchanges in the last 18 months have stolen millions of dollars of bitcoin and other digital currencies. Plus, a large share of cryptocurrency trades appear to be fake, some researchers say.
Forbes Headline: Bitcoin Falls More Than 8% As Crypto Markets See Red - https://bit.ly/2At253P
Bitcoin prices dropped by more than 8% today, approaching the $9,000 level as digital currency markets suffered widespread losses. The world's most prominent cryptocurrency fell to as little as $9,108.47 close to 1 p.m. EDT, CoinDesk figures show.

In Crypto Publications headlines.

Cointelegraph reports: Karpeles Says Mt Gox Verdict May Set ‘Dangerous’ Precedent - https://bit.ly/2YwXHIY
Karpeles Says Mt Gox Verdict May Set 'Dangerous' Precedent. A day after a Tokyo court upheld charges against him, Mark Karpeles, the former owner and CEO of Mt. ... On June 11, Tokyo District Court Judge Mariko Goto struck down Karpeles' appeal to a previous charge of tampering with financial data
CoinDesk.com headline: Why This Dev Built a ‘Centralized Ethereum’ on Top of Bitcoin’s Lightning Network - https://bit.ly/2MQekKl
Pseudonymous developer Fiatjaf has created Etleneum, which he describes as a “centralized” version of Ethereum that runs on payments from Bitcoin’s Lightning Network. Hence the name, a portmanteau of “Ethereum” and “Lightning.” (If that’s too subtle, the Etleneum logo is a diamond shape like Ethereum’s with a lightning bolt running through it.) Like Ethereum, Etleneum has “contracts,” automated agreements over what rules need to be met before money can be dispensed. The contracts are public like Ethereum’s, and like the world’s second-largest blockchain by market capitalization, Fiatjaf’s platform is open to anyone to use.
Cryptonews.com reports on its front page: Stock Sell-Off Eases While Bitcoin Follows Stocks Again - https://bit.ly/3dVvj9T
As of press time on Friday morning (08:33 UTC), bitcoin was down by 3% over the past 24 hours to trade at a price of USD 9,491. The loss comes after the number one cryptoasset briefly traded above the USD 10k mark early yesterday morning UTC time, before a sharp sell-off sent it all the way down to the USD 9,050 level.
submitted by Gigantile to altcoin_news [link] [comments]

Why we won't have a long term bear market, and how to systematically pick your future investments in crypto

With so much uncertainty right now it would be a good time to take some time to go over what happened recently and how to invest moving foward. We've seen a peak bubble at around 850 billion total market cap in the first week of January, consolidated down to $750 billion and have now just experienced a 40% correction.

What's happening now and how bad will it get?

First of all you should realize that there is a January Dip that happens every year, when we see a roughly 20-30% decline around mid January. This year its been much more severe though for several additional factors that have compounded on top.
Different theories exist on why this happens (its actually the mirror opposite of the "January Effect" that happens in the US stock market), but the two major theories are:
1) Asian markets pull into fiat because of Asian New Year spending needs
2) People in the US sell in January to defer their capital gains tax liability an extra year
While this cyclic event has lead to a healthy correction in the last few years, this year we got these new factors making more fear as well:
So in essence we got a storm of scary news along with the usual cyclic downturn. Currently I don't see this as being a systematic crash like Mt.Gox was that would lead to a long term bear market because the fundamental ecosystem is still intact, and I suspect that after about a month we should consolidate around a new low. All the exchanges are still operational and liquid, and there is no breakdown in trust nor uncertainty whether you'll be able to cash out. What range the market trades in will all depend how Bitcoin does, right now we've already broken below 10K but I'm seeing a lot of support at around $8000, which is roughly where the long term MA curve settles. We don't know how bad it will get or what the future will bring, but as of right now we shouldn't be in a bear market yet.
What should you do if you recently entered the market?
If you did buy in the last few months at or near ATH, the very worst thing you can do now is sell in panic and lose your principal. You shouldn't have more money in crypto than you can afford to lose, so it shouldn't be a problem to wait. You have to realize that 30% corrections in crypto are relatively common, just last fall we had a 40% flash correction over more China fears. Unless there is a systematic breakdown like we had during Mt.Gox, the market always recovers.
The other worst thing you can do is unload into Tether as your safety net. If there is one thing that could actually cause a long term destruction of trust within the cryptocurrency investment ecosystem, its Tether having a run up on their liabilities and not having enough reserve to cover the leverage. It would not only bring down exchanges but lead to years of litigation and endless media headlines that will scare off everybody from putting fiat in. I don't know when the next Mt.Gox meltdown will occur but I can almost guarantee it will involve Tether. So stay away from it.
What should long term investors do?
For long term holders a good strategy to follow each year is to capture profit each December and swallow the capital gains taxation liability, park a reserve of fiat at Gemini (whose US dollar deposits are FDIC-insured) and simply wait till around late January to early February to re-enter the market at a discount and hold all year until next December. You can keep a small amount in core coins in order to trade around various Q1 opportunities you anticipate. Others may choose to simply do nothing and just keep holding throughout January which is also a perfectly fine strategy. The cyclical correction usually stabilizes toward late January and early February, then we see a rise in March and generally are recovered by end of April. Obviously this decision whether to sell in December to profit on the dip and pay tax liability or to just hold will depend on your individual tax situation. Do your own math sometime in November and follow suit.
Essentially revaluate your positions and trim your position sizes if you don't feel comfortable with the losses.

How to construct your portfolio going forward

Rather than seeing the correction as a disaster see it as a time to start fresh. If you have been FOMO-ing into bad cryptos and losing money now is a time to start a systematic long term approach to investing rather than gambling.
Follow a methodology for evaluating each cryptocurrency
Memes and lambo dreams are fun and all, but I know many of you are investing thousands of dollars into crypto, so its worth it to put some organized thought into it as well. I can't stress enough how important it is to try and logically contruct your investment decisions. If you follow a set methodology, a checklist and template you will be able to do relative comparisons between cryptocurrencies, to force yourself to consider the negatives and alternative scenarios and also sleep comfortably knowing you have a sound basis for your investment decisions (even if they turn out to be wrong).
There is no ideal or "correct" methodology but I can outline mine:
1) Initial information gathering and filtering
Once I identify something that looks like a good potential investment, I first go to the CoinMarketCap page for that symbol and look at the website and blockchain explorer.
  • Critically evaluate the website. This is the first pass of the bullshit detector and you can tell from a lot from just the website whether its a scam. If it uses terms like "Web 4.0" or other nonsensical buzzwords, if its unprofessional and has anonymous teams, stay away. Always look for a roadmap, compare to what was actually delivered so far. Always check the team, try to find them on LinkedIn and what they did in the past.
  • Read the whitepaper or business development plan. You should fully understand how this crypto functions and how its trying to create value. If there is no use case or if the use case does not require or benefit from a blockchain, move on. Look for red flags like massive portions of the float being assigned to the founders of the coin, vague definition of who would use the coin, anonymous teams, promises of large payouts...etc
  • Check the blockchain explorer. How is the token distribution across accounts? Are the big accounts holding or selling? Which account is likely the foundation account, which is the founders account?
  • Read the subreddit and blogs for the cryptocurrency and also evaluate the community. Try to figure out exactly what the potential use cases are and look for sceptical takes. Look at the Github repos, does it look empty or is there plenty of activity?
2) Fill out an Investment Checklist
I have a checklist of questions that I find important and as I'm researching a crypto I save little snippets in Evernote of things that are relevant to answering those questions:
  • What is the problem or transactional inefficiency the coin is trying to solve?
  • What is the Dev Team like? What is their track record? How are they funded, organized?
  • Who is their competition and how big is the market they're targeting? What is the roadmap they created?
  • What current product exists?
  • How does the token/coin actually derive value for the holder? Is there a staking mechanism or is it transactional?
  • What are the weaknesses or problems with this crypto?
3) Create some sort of consistent valuation model/framework, even if its simple
I have a background in finance so I like to do Excel modeling. For those who are interested in that, this article is a great start and also Chris Burniske has a great blog about using Quantity Theory of Money to build an equivalent of a DCF analysis for crypto.
Here is an Excel file example of OMG done using his model. You can download this and play around with it yourself, see how the formulas link and understand the logic.
Once you have a model set up the way you like in Excel you can simply alter it to account for various float oustanding schedule and market items that are unique to your crypto, and then just start plugging in different assumptions. Think about what is the true derivation of value for the coin, is it a "dividend" coin that you stake within a digital economy and collect fees or is it a currency? Use a realistic monetary velocity (around 5-10 for currency and around 1-2 for staking) and for the discount rate use at least 3x the long term return of a diversified equity fund.
The benefit is that this forces you to think about what actually makes this coin valuable to an actual user within the digital economy its participating in and force you to think about the assumptions you are making about the future. Do your assumptions make sense? What would the assumptions have to be to justify its current price? You can create different scenarios in a matrix (optimistic vs. pessimistic) based on different assumptions for risk (discount rate) and implementation (adoption rates).
If you don't understand the above thats perfectly fine, you don't need to get into full modeling or have a financial background. Even a simple model that just tries to derive a valuation through relative terms will put you above most crypto investors. Some simple valuation methods that anyone can do
  • Metcalfe's Law which states that the value of a network is proportional to the square of the number of connected users of the system (n2). So you can compare various currencies based on their market cap and square of active users or traffic.
  • Another easy one is simply looking at the total market for the industry that the coin is supposedly targeting and comparing it to the market cap of the coin. Think of the market cap not only with circulating supply like its shown on CMC but including total supply. For example the total supply for Dentacoin is 1,841,395,638,392, and when multiplied by its price in early January we get a market cap that is actually higher than the entire industry it aims to disrupt: Dentistry.
  • If its meant to be just used as just a currency: Take a look at the circulating supply and look at the amount that is in cold storage or set to be released/burned. Most cryptos are deflationary so think about how the float schedule will change over time and how this will affect price.
Once you have a model you like set up, you can compare cryptos against each other and most importantly it will require that you build a mental framework within your own mind on why somebody would want to own this coin other than to sell it to another greater fool for a higher price. Modeling out a valuation will lead you to think long term and think about the inherent value, rather than price action.
Once you go through this 3-step methodology, you'll have a pretty good confidence level for making your decision and can comfortably sit back and not panic if some temporary short term condition leads to a price decrease. This is how "smart money" does it.
Think about your portfolio allocation
You should think first in broad terms how you allocate between "safe" and "speculative" cryptos.
For new investors its best to keep a substantial portion in what would be considered largecap safe cryptos, primarily BTC, ETH, LTC. I personally consider XMR to be safe as well. A good starting point is to have between 50-70% of your portfolio in these safe cryptocurrencies. As you become more confident and informed you can move your allocation into speculative small caps.
You should also think in terms of segments and how much of your total portfolio is in each segment:
  • Core holdings - BTC, Ethereum, LTC...etc
  • Platform segment - Ethereum, NEO, Ark...etc
  • Privacy segment - Monero, Zcash, PivX..etc
  • Finance/Bank settlement segment - Ripple, Stellar...etc
  • Enterprise Blockchain solutions segment -VeChain, Walton, WABI...etc
  • Promising/Innovative Tech segment - Raiblocks, IOTA, Cardano...etc
You should also think about where we are in the cycle, as now given so much uncertaintly its probably best to stay heavily in core holdings and pick up a few coins within a segment you understand well. If you don't understand how enterprise solutions work or how the value chain is built through corporations, don't invest in the enteprise blockchain solutions segment. If you are a technie who loves the technology behind Cardano or IOTA, invest in that segment.
Think of your "circle of competence"
This is actually a term Buffet came up with, it refers to your body of knowledge that allows you to evaluate an investment. Think about what you know best and consider investing in those type of coins. If you don't know anything about how supply chains functions, how can you competently judge whether VeChain or WaltonChain will achieve adoption?
This where your portfolio allocation also comes into play. You should diversify but really shouldn't be in much more than around 12 cryptos, because you simply don't have enough competency to accurately access the risk across every segment and for every type of crypto you come across. If you had over 20 different cryptos in your portfolio you should probably think about consolidating to a few sectors you understand well.
Continually educate yourself about the technology and markets
If you aren't already doing it: Read a bit each day about cryptocurrencies. There are decent Youtubers that talk about the market side of crypto, just avoid those that hype specific coins and look for more sceptical ones like CryptoInvestor. If you don't understand how the technology works and what the benefits of a blockchain are or how POS/POW works or what a DAG is or how mining actually works, learn first. If you don't care about the technology or find reading about it tedious, you shouldn't invest in this space at all.

Summing it up

I predicted a few days ago that we would have a major correction in 2018 specifically in the altcoins that saw massive gains in Decemebeearly January, and it seems we've already had a pretty big one. I don't think we'll have a complete meltdown like some are predicting, but some more pain may be incoming.
Basically take this time to think about how you can improve your investment style and strategy. Make a commitment to value things rather than chasing FOMO, and take your time to make a decision. Long term investment will grant you much more returns as will a systematic approach.
Take care and have fun investing :)
Edit March 2018: Lol looking back I'm regretting starting the title with "Why we won't have a long term bear market" now, I was more karma whoring with that catchy title than anything. We recovered up to 11K from this post, but then crashed again hard later in February-March because of a slew of reasons from Tether subpeona to unforseen regulatory issues.
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Confirmed: Bloomberg staff are testing a bitcoin price ticker

Confirmed: Bloomberg staff are testing a bitcoin price ticker submitted by Rx_Rex to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Nuvmining | What Is Bitcoin, How Is It Various Than "Real" Cash and also How Can I Get Some?

Bitcoin is a digital money. It does not exist in the kind of physical type that the currency & coin we're used to exist in. It does not even exist in a type as physical as Syndicate cash. It's electrons - not molecules.
nuv mining
Yet consider just how much cash you directly handle. You obtain an income that you require to the bank - or it's autodeposited without you even seeing the paper that it's not printed on. You after that utilize a debit card (or a checkbook, if you're old school) to access those funds. At finest, you see 10% of it in a money form in your pocket or in your pocketbook. So, it turns out that 90% of the funds that you take care of are online - electrons in a spreadsheet or data source.
nuvmining
However delay - those are UNITED STATE funds (or those of whatever nation you come from), safe in the financial institution and also ensured by the complete belief of the FDIC approximately about $250K per account, right? Well, not exactly. Your banks might just called for to maintain 10% of its deposits on down payment. In some cases, it's much less. It offers the rest of your cash bent on other individuals for approximately thirty years. It charges them for the funding, and also costs you for the advantage of letting them offer it out.
Just how does money obtain developed?
Your financial institution reaches produce money by offering it out.
State you deposit $1,000 with your bank. They then lend out $900 of it. Unexpectedly you have $1000 as well as another person has $900. Magically, there's $1900 floating around where prior to there was only a grand.
Currently claim your bank instead offers 900 of your dollars to another financial institution. That financial institution in turn lends $810 to an additional financial institution, which after that offers $720 to a client. Poof! $3,430 in an immediate - virtually $2500 produced out of nothing - as long as the bank follows your federal government's central bank rules.
Production of Bitcoin is as different from bank funds' creation as cash money is from electrons. It is not managed by a government's reserve bank, but rather by consensus of its customers as well as nodes. It is not developed by a restricted mint in a structure, however rather by dispersed open source software program and computer. As well as it needs a type of real work for production. Extra on that particular shortly.
Who created BitCoin?
The very first BitCoins remained in a block of 50 (the "Genesis Block") created by Satoshi Nakomoto in January 2009. It really did not really have any type of worth initially. It was simply a cryptographer's toy based on a paper published two months earlier by Nakomoto. Nakotmoto is an evidently imaginary name - nobody appears to know that she or he or they is/are.
That monitors everything?
Once the Genesis Block was developed, BitCoins have actually because been produced by doing the work of keeping track of all deals for all BitCoins as a kind of public journal. The nodes/ computers doing the computations on the journal are awarded for doing so. For each collection of effective calculations, the node is rewarded with a specific quantity of BitCoin (" BTC"), which are after that freshly produced right into the BitCoin community. For this reason the term, "BitCoin Miner" - because the procedure develops new BTC. As the supply of BTC increases, and also as the number of transactions boosts, the job essential to update the public ledger gets harder and also much more complicated. As a result, the variety of new BTC right into the system is created to be concerning 50 BTC (one block) every 10 minutes, worldwide.
Although the computer power for mining BitCoin (as well as for upgrading the public ledger) is currently boosting exponentially, so is the intricacy of the mathematics problem (which, incidentally, additionally needs a certain amount of thinking), or "evidence" needed to mine BitCoin as well as to settle the transactional publications at any type of provided moment. So the system still only generates one 50 BTC block every 10 minutes, or 2106 blocks every 2 weeks.
So, in a sense, everyone tracks it - that is, all the nodes in the network keep track of the background of every single BitCoin.
Just how much is there and also where is it?
There is a maximum variety of BitCoin that can ever before be produced, and that number is 21 million. According to the Khan Academy, the number is anticipated to peak around the year 2140.
Since, today there were 12.1 million BTC in flow
Your very own BitCoin are kept in a documents (your BitCoin purse) in your very own storage space - your computer system. The data itself is evidence of the number of BTC you have, and also it can move with you on a mobile phone.
If that data with the cryptographic key in your wallet obtains lost, so does your supply of BitCoin funds. And also you can't obtain it back.
Just how much is it worth?
The value differs based on just how much people believe it deserves - similar to in the exchange of "real cash." Yet due to the fact that there is no central authority trying to maintain the value around a certain level, it can vary a lot more dynamically. The very first BTC were generally worth absolutely nothing at the time, however those BTC still exist. Since 11AM on December 11, 2013, the general public value was $906.00 United States per BitCoin. When I completed composing this sentence, it was $900.00. Around the start of 2013, the value was around $20.00 United States. On November 27, 2013 it was valued at greater than $1,000.00 United States per BTC. So it's kind of unstable presently, yet it's expected to calm down.
The complete value of all BitCoin - since the period at the end of this sentence - is around 11 billion US bucks.
How can I get me some?
First, you have to have a BitCoin purse. This post has links to get one.
Then one method is to purchase some from one more private party, like these individuals on Bloomberg TV. One method is to purchase some on an exchange, like Mt. Gox.
As well as finally, one means is to dedicate a lot of computer power as well as power to the process as well as become a BitCoin miner. That's well outside the extent of this post. However if you have a couple of thousand extra dollars lying around, you can obtain rather a gear.
Exactly how can I spend it?
There are numerous vendors of all sizes that take BitCoin in payment, from cafes to auto dealers. There's also a BitCoin ATM in Vancouver, British Columbia for transforming your BTC to cash in Vancouver, BC.
And so?
Money has had a lengthy background - centuries in size. Somewhat recent tale tells us that Manhattan Island was bought for wampum - seashells & the like. In the very early years of the United States, different financial institutions printed their own money. On a recent visit to Salt Spring Island in British Columbia, I invested currency that was just good on the beautiful island. The common style among these was a trust agreement amongst its customers that specific currency held value. In some cases that worth was tied directly to something strong and physical, like gold. In 1900 the U.S. connected its currency straight to gold (the "Gold Requirement") and in 1971, ended that tie.
Currently money is traded like any kind of various other commodity, although a certain nation's currency worth can be propped up or decreased through activities of their reserve bank. BitCoin is an alternative money that is also traded as well as its value, like that of various other products, is figured out via trade, yet is not stood up or lessened by the action of any kind of bank, however rather straight by the activities of its individuals. Its supply is minimal as well as known nevertheless, and also (unlike physical money) so is the history of each and every single BitCoin. Its viewed worth, like all various other money, is based on its utility and also count on.
As a form of currency, BitCoin not specifically a new thing in Production, however it absolutely is a new means for cash to be created.
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25 Tools and Resources for Crypto Investors: Guide to how to create a winning strategy

Lots of people have PM'd me asking me the same questions on where to find information and how to put together their portfolio so I decided to put a guide for crypto investors, especially those who have only been in a few months and are still confused.
This is going to be Part 1 and will deal with research resources, risk and returns. In Part 2 I'll post a systematic approach to valuation and picking individual assets with derived price targets.

Getting started: Tools and resources

You don't have to be a programmer or techie to invest in crypto, but you should first learn the basics of how it functions. I find that this video by 3Blue1Brown is the best introduction to what a blockchain actually is and how it functions, because it explains it clearly and simply with visuals while not dumbing it down too much. If you want a more ELI5 version with cute cartoons, then Upfolio has a nice beginner's intro to the blockchain concept and quick descriptions of top 100 cryptocurrencies. I also recommend simply going to Wikipedia and reading the blockchain and cryptocurrency page and clicking onto a few links in, read about POS vs POW...etc. Later on you'll need this information to understand why a specific use case may or may not benefit from a blockchain structure. Here is a quick summary of the common terms you should know.
Next you should arm yourself with some informational resources. I compiled a convenient list of useful tools and sites that I've used and find to be worthy of bookmarking:
Market information
Analysis tools
Portfolio Tracking
Youtube
I generally don't follow much on Youtube because it's dominated by idiocy like Trevon James and CryptoNick, but there are some that I think are worthy of following:

Constructing a Investment Strategy

I can't stress enough how important it is to construct an actual investment strategy. Organize what your goals are, what your risk tolerance is and how you plan to construct a portfolio to achieve those goals rather than just chasing the flavor of the week.
Why? Because it will force you to slow down and make decisions based on rational thinking rather than emotion, and will also inevitably lead you to think long term.

Setting ROI targets

Bluntly put, a lot of young investors who are in crypto have really unrealistic expectations about returns and risk.
A lot of them have never invested in any other type of financial asset, and hence many seem to consider a 10% ROI in a month to be unexciting, even though that is roughly what they should be aiming for.
I see a ton of people now on this sub and on other sites making their decisions with the expectation to double their money every month. This has lead a worrying amount of newbies putting in way too much money way too quickly into anything on the front page of CoinMarketCap with a low dollar value per coin hoping that crypto get them out of their debt or a life of drudgery in a cubicle. And all in the next year or two!
But its important to temper your hype about returns and realize why we had this exponential growth in the last year. Its not because we are seeing any mass increase in adoption, if anything adoption among eCommerce sites is decreasing. The only reason we saw so much upward price action is because of fiat monetary base expansion from people FOMO-ing in due to media coverage of previous price action. People are hoping to ride the bubble and sell to a greater fool in a few months, it is classic Greater Fool Theory. That's it. We passed the $1,000 psychological marker again for Bitcoin which we hadn't seen since right before the Mt.Gox disaster, and it just snowballed the positivity as headline after headline came out about the price growth. However those unexciting returns of 10% a month are not only the norm, but much more healthy for an alternative investment class. Here are the annual returns for Bitcoin for the last few years:
Year BTC Return
2017 1,300%
2016 120%
2015 35%
2014 -60%
2013 5300%
2012 150 %
Keep in mind that a 10% monthly increase when compounded equals a 313% annual return, or over 3x your money. That may not sound exciting to those who entered recently and saw their money go 20x in a month on something like Tron before it crashed back down, but that 3X annual return is better than Bitcoin's return every year except the year right before the last market meltdown and 2017. I have been saying for a while now that we are due for a major correction and every investor now should be planning for that possibility through proper allocation and setting return expectations that are reasonable.

Risk Management

Quanitifying risk in crypto is surprisingly difficult because the historical returns aren't normally distributed, meaning that tools like Sharpe Ratio and other risk metrics can't really be used as intended. Instead you'll have to think of your own risk tolerance and qualitatively evaluate how risky each crypto is based on the team, the use case prospects, the amount of competition and the general market risk.
You can think of each crypto having a risk factor that is the summation of the general crypto market risk (Rm) as ultimately everything is tied to how Bitcoin does, but also its own inherent risk specific to its own goals (Ri).
Rt = Rm +Ri
The market risk is something you cannot avoid, if some China FUD comes out about regulations on Bitcoin then your investment in solid altcoin picks will go down too along with Bitcoin. This (Rm) return is essentially what risk you undertake to have a market ROI of 385% I talked about above. What you can minimize though is the Ri, the aset specific risks with the team, the likelihood they will actually deliver, the likelihood that their solution will be adopted. Unfortunately there is no one way to do this, you simply have to take the time to research and form your own opinion on how risky it really is before allocating a certain percentage to it. Consider the individual risk of each crypto and start looking for red flags:
  • guaranteed promises of large returns (protip: that's a Ponzi)
  • float allocations that give way too much to the founder
  • vague whitepapers
  • vague timelines
  • no clear use case
  • Github with no useful code and sparse activity
  • a team that is difficult to find information on or even worse anonymous
While all cryptocurrencies are a risky investments but generally you can break down cryptos into "low" risk core, medium risk speculative and high risk speculative
  • Low Risk Core - This is the exchange pairing cryptos and those that are well established. These are almost sure to be around in 5 years, and will recover after any bear market. Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ethereum are in this class of risk, and I would also argue Monero.
  • Medium Risk Speculative - These would be cryptos which generally have at least some product and are reasonably established, but higher risk than Core. Things like ZCash, Ripple, NEO..etc.
  • High Risk Speculative - This is anything created within the last few months, low caps, shillcoins, ICOs...etc. Most cryptos are in this category, most of them will be essentially worthless in 5 years.
How much risk should you take on? That depends on your own life situation but also it should be proportional to how much expertise you have in both financial analysis and technology. If you're a newbie who doesn't understand the tech and has no idea how to value assets, your risk tolerance should be lower than a programmer who understand the tech or a financial analyst who is experienced in valuation metrics.
Right now the trio of BTC-ETH-LTC account for 55% of the market cap, so between 50-70% of your portfolio in low Risk Core for newbies is a great starting point. Then you can go down to 25-30% as you gain confidence and experience. But always try to keep about 1/3rd in safe core positions. Don't go all in on speculative picks.
Core principles to minimize risk
  • Have the majority of your holdings in things you feel good holding for at least 2 years. Don't use the majority of your investment for day trading or short term investing.
  • Consider using dollar cost averaging to enter a position. This generally means investing a X amount over several periods, instead of at once. You can also use downward biased dollar cost averaging to mitigate against downward risk. For example instead of investing $1000 at once in a position at market price, you can buy $500 at the market price today then set several limit orders at slightly lower intervals (for example $250 at 5% lower than market price, $250 at 10% lower than market price). This way your average cost of acquisition will be lower if the crypto happens to decline over the short term.
  • Never chase a pump. Its simply too risky as its such an inefficient and unregulated market. If you continue to do it, most of your money losing decisions will be because you emotionally FOMO-ed into gambling on a symbol.
  • Invest what you can afford to lose. Don't have more than 5-10% of your net worth in crypto.
  • Consider what level of loss you can't accept in a position with a high risk factor, and use stop-limit orders to hedge against sudden crashes. Set you stop price at about 5-10% above your lowest limit. Stop-limit orders aren't perfect but they're better than having no hedging strategy for a risky microcap in case of some meltdown. Only you can determine what bags you are unwilling to hold.
  • Diversify across sectors and rebalance your allocations periodically. Keep about 1/3rd in low risk core holdings.
  • Have some fiat in reserve at a FDIC-insured exchange (ex. Gemini), and be ready to add to your winning positions on a pullback.
  • Remember you didn't actually make any money until you take some profits, so take do some profits when everyone else is at peak FOMO-ing bubble mode. You will also sleep much more comfortably once you take out the equivalent of your principal.

Portfolio Allocation

Along with thinking about your portfolio in terms of risk categories described above, I really find it helpful to think about the segments you are in. OnChainFX has some segment categorization to think about:
  • Currency
  • General Purpose Platform
  • Advertising
  • Crowdfunding Platform
  • Lending Platform
  • Privacy
  • Distributed Computing/Storage
  • Prediction Markets
  • IOT (Internet of Things)
  • Asset Management
  • Content Creation
  • Exchange Platform
I generally like to simplify these down to these 7 segments:
  • Core holdings - essentially the Low Risk Core segment
  • Platform segment
  • Privacy segment
  • Finance/Bank settlement segment
  • Enterprise Blockchain solutions segment
  • Promising/Innovative Tech segment
This is merely what I use, but I'm sure you can think of your own. The key point I have is to try to invest your medium and high risk picks in a segment you understand well, and in which you can relatively accurately judge risk. If you don't understand anything about how banking works or SWIFT or international settlement layers, don't invest in Stellar. If you have no idea how a supply chain functions, avoid investing in VeChain (even if it's being shilled to death on Reddit at the moment just like XRB was last month). Buffet calls this "circle of competence", he invests in sectors he understands and avoids those he doesn't like tech. I think doing the same thing in crypto is a wise move.
What's interesting is that often we see like-coin movement, for example when a coin from one segment pumps we will frequently see another similar coin in the same segment go up (think Stellar following after Ripple).
Consider the historic correlations between your holdings. Generally when Bitcoin pumps, altcoins dump but at what rate depends on the coin. When Bitcoin goes sideways we tend to see pumping in altcoins, while when Bitcoin goes down, everything goes down.
You should set price targets for each of your holdings, which is a whole separate discussion I'll go in Part 2 of the guide.

Summing it up

This was meant to get you think about what return targets you should set for your portfolio and how much risk you are willing to take and what strategies you can follow to mitigate that risk.
Returns around 385% (average crypto market CAGR over the last 3 years) would be a good target to aim for while remaining realistic, you can tweak it a bit based on your own risk tolerance. What category of risk your individual crypto picks should be will be determined by how much more greed you have for above average market return. A portfolio of 50% core holdings, 30% medium risk in a sector you understand well and 20% in high risk speculative is probably what the average portfolio should look like, with newbies going more towards 70% core and only 5% high risk speculative.
Just by thinking about these things you'll likely do better than most crypto investors, because most don't think about this stuff, to their own detriment.
submitted by arsonbunny to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Crypto Investing Guide: Useful resources and tools, and how to create an investment strategy

Lots of people have PM'd me asking me the same questions on where to find information and how to put together their portfolio so I decided to put a guide for crypto investors, especially those who have only been in a few months and are still confused.
Many people entered recently at a time when the market was rewarding the very worst type of investment behavior. Unfortunately there aren't many guides and a lot of people end up looking at things like Twitter or the trending Youtube crypto videos, which is dominated by "How to make $1,00,000 by daytrading crypto" and influencers like CryptoNick.
So I'll try to put together a guide from what I've learned and some tips, on how to invest in this asset class. This is going to be Part 1, in another post later I'll post a systematic approach to valuation and picking individual assets.

Getting started: Tools and resources

You don't have to be a programmer or techie to invest in crypto, but you should first learn the basics of how it functions. I find that this video by 3Blue1Brown is the best introduction to what a blockchain actually is and how it functions, because it explains it clearly and simply with visuals while not dumbing it down too much. If you want a more ELI5 version with cute cartoons, then Upfolio has a nice beginner's intro to the blockchain concept and quick descriptions of top 100 cryptocurrencies. I also recommend simply going to Wikipedia and reading the blockchain and cryptocurrency page and clicking onto a few links in, read about POS vs POW...etc. Later on you'll need this information to understand why a specific use case may or may not benefit from a blockchain structure. Here is a quick summary of the common terms you should know.
Next you should arm yourself with some informational resources. I compiled a convenient list of useful tools and sites that I've used and find to be worthy of bookmarking:
Market information
Analysis tools
Portfolio Tracking
Youtube
I generally don't follow much on Youtube because it's dominated by idiocy like Trevon James and CryptoNick, but there are some that I think are worthy of following:

Constructing a Investment Strategy

I can't stress enough how important it is to construct an actual investment strategy. Organize what your goals are, what your risk tolerance is and how you plan to construct a portfolio to achieve those goals rather than just chasing the flavor of the week.
Why? Because it will force you to slow down and make decisions based on rational thinking rather than emotion, and will also inevitably lead you to think long term.

Setting ROI targets

Bluntly put, a lot of young investors who are in crypto have really unrealistic expectations about returns and risk.
A lot of them have never invested in any other type of financial asset, and hence many seem to consider a 10% ROI in a month to be unexciting, even though that is roughly what they should be aiming for.
I see a ton of people now on this sub and on other sites making their decisions with the expectation to double their money every month. This has lead a worrying amount of newbies putting in way too much money way too quickly into anything on the front page of CoinMarketCap with a low dollar value per coin hoping that crypto get them out of their debt or a life of drudgery in a cubicle. And all in the next year or two!
But its important to temper your hype about returns and realize why we had this exponential growth in the last year. The only reason we saw so much upward price action is because of fiat monetary base expansion from people FOMO-ing in due to media coverage. People are hoping to ride the bubble and sell to a greater fool in a few months, it is classic Greater Fool Theory. That's it. Its not because we are seeing any mass increase in adoption or actual widespread utility with cryptocurrency. We passed the $1,000 psychological marker again for Bitcoin which we hadn't seen since right before the Mt.Gox disaster, and it just snowballed the positivity as headline after headline came out about the price growth. However those unexciting returns of 10% a month are not only the norm, but much more healthy for an alternative investment class. Here are the annual returns for Bitcoin for the last few years:
Year BTC Return
2017 1,300%
2016 120%
2015 35%
2014 -60%
2013 5300%
2012 150 %
Keep in mind that a 10% monthly increase when compounded equals a 313% annual return, or over 3x your money. That may not sound exciting to those who entered recently and saw their money go 20x in a month on something like Tron before it crashed back down, but that 3X annual return is better than Bitcoin's return every year except the year right before the last market meltdown and 2017. I have been saying for a while now that we are due for a major correction and every investor now should be planning for that possibility through proper allocation and setting return expectations that are reasonable.
How to set a realistic ROI target
How do I set my own personal return target?
Basically I aim to achieve a portfolio return of roughly 385% annually (3.85X increase per year) or about 11.89% monthly return when compounded. How did I come up with that target? I base it on the average compounded annual growth return (CAGR) over the last 3 years on the entire market:
Year Total Crypto Market Cap
Jan 1, 2014: $10.73 billion
Jan 1, 2017: $615 billion
Compounded annual growth return (CAGR): (615/10.73)1/3 = 385%
My personal strategy is to sell my portfolio every December then buy back into the market at around the beginning of February and I intend to hold on average for 3 years, so this works for me but you may choose to do it a different way for your own reasons. I think this is a good average to aim for as a general guideline because it includes both the good years (2017) and the bad (2014). Once you have a target you can construct your risk profile (low risk vs. high risk category coins) in your portfolio. If you want to try for a higher CAGR than about 385% then you will likely need to go into more highly speculative picks. I can't tell you what return target you should set for yourself, but just make sure its not depended on you needing to achieve continual near vertical parabolic price action in small cap shillcoins because that isn't sustainable.
As the recent January dip showed while the core cryptos like Bitcoin and Ethereum would dip an X percentage, the altcoins would often drop double or triple that amount. Its a very fragile market, and the type of dumb behavior that people were engaging in that was profitable in a bull market (chasing pumps, going all in on a microcap shillcoin, having an attention span of a squirrel...etc) will lead to consequences. Just like they jumped on the crypto bandwagon without thinking about risk adjusted returns, they will just as quickly jump on whatever bandwagon will be used to blame for the deflation of the bubble, whether the blame is assigned to Wall Steet and Bitcoin futures or Asians or some government.
Nobody who pumped money into garbage without any use case or utility will accept that they themselves and their own unreasonable expectations for returns were the reason for the gross mispricing of most cryptocurrencies.

Risk Management

Quanitifying risk in crypto is surprisingly difficult because the historical returns aren't normally distributed, meaning that tools like Sharpe Ratio and other risk metrics can't really be used as intended. Instead you'll have to think of your own risk tolerance and qualitatively evaluate how risky each crypto is based on the team, the use case prospects, the amount of competition and the general market risk.
You can think of each crypto having a risk factor that is the summation of the general crypto market risk (Rm) as ultimately everything is tied to how Bitcoin does, but also its own inherent risk specific to its own goals (Ri).
Rt = Rm +Ri
The market risk is something you cannot avoid, if some China FUD comes out about regulations on Bitcoin then your investment in solid altcoin picks will go down too along with Bitcoin. This (Rm) return is essentially what risk you undertake to have a market ROI of 385% I talked about above. What you can minimize though is the Ri, the aset specific risks with the team, the likelihood they will actually deliver, the likelihood that their solution will be adopted. Unfortunately there is no one way to do this, you simply have to take the time to research and form your own opinion on how risky it really is before allocating a certain percentage to it. Consider the individual risk of each crypto and start looking for red flags:
  • guaranteed promises of large returns (protip: that's a Ponzi)
  • float allocations that give way too much to the founder
  • vague whitepapers
  • vague timelines
  • no clear use case
  • Github with no useful code and sparse activity
  • a team that is difficult to find information on or even worse anonymous
While all cryptocurrencies are a risky investments but generally you can break down cryptos into "low" risk core, medium risk speculative and high risk speculative
  • Low Risk Core - This is the exchange pairing cryptos and those that are well established. These are almost sure to be around in 5 years, and will recover after any bear market. Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ethereum are in this class of risk, and I would also argue Monero.
  • Medium Risk Speculative - These would be cryptos which generally have at least some product and are reasonably established, but higher risk than Core. Things like ZCash, Ripple, NEO..etc.
  • High Risk Speculative - This is anything created within the last few months, low caps, shillcoins, ICOs...etc. Most cryptos are in this category, most of them will be essentially worthless in 5 years.
How much risk should you take on? That depends on your own life situation but also it should be proportional to how much expertise you have in both financial analysis and technology. If you're a newbie who doesn't understand the tech and has no idea how to value assets, your risk tolerance should be lower than a programmer who understand the tech or a financial analyst who is experienced in valuation metrics.
Right now the trio of BTC-ETH-LTC account for 55% of the market cap, so between 50-70% of your portfolio in low Risk Core for newbies is a great starting point. Then you can go down to 25-30% as you gain confidence and experience. But always try to keep about 1/3rd in safe core positions. Don't go all in on speculative picks.
Core principles to minimize risk
  • Have the majority of your holdings in things you feel good holding for at least 2 years. Don't use the majority of your investment for day trading or short term investing.
  • Consider using dollar cost averaging to enter a position. This generally means investing a X amount over several periods, instead of at once. You can also use downward biased dollar cost averaging to mitigate against downward risk. For example instead of investing $1000 at once in a position at market price, you can buy $500 at the market price today then set several limit orders at slightly lower intervals (for example $250 at 5% lower than market price, $250 at 10% lower than market price). This way your average cost of acquisition will be lower if the crypto happens to decline over the short term.
  • Never chase a pump. Its simply too risky as its such an inefficient and unregulated market. If you continue to do it, most of your money losing decisions will be because you emotionally FOMO-ed into gambling on a symbol.
  • Invest what you can afford to lose. Don't have more than 5-10% of your net worth in crypto.
  • Consider what level of loss you can't accept in a position with a high risk factor, and use stop-limit orders to hedge against sudden crashes. Set you stop price at about 5-10% above your lowest limit. Stop-limit orders aren't perfect but they're better than having no hedging strategy for a risky microcap in case of some meltdown. Only you can determine what bags you are unwilling to hold.
  • Diversify across sectors and rebalance your allocations periodically. Keep about 1/3rd in low risk core holdings.
  • Have some fiat in reserve at a FDIC-insured exchange (ex. Gemini), and be ready to add to your winning positions on a pullback.
  • Remember you didn't actually make any money until you take some profits, so take do some profits when everyone else is at peak FOMO-ing bubble mode. You will also sleep much more comfortably once you take out the equivalent of your principal.

Portfolio Allocation

Along with thinking about your portfolio in terms of risk categories described above, I really find it helpful to think about the segments you are in. OnChainFX has some segment categorization but I generally like to bring it down to:
  • Core holdings - essentially the Low Risk Core segment
  • Platform segment
  • Privacy segment
  • Finance/Bank settlement segment
  • Enterprise Blockchain solutions segment
  • Promising/Innovative Tech segment
This is merely what I use, but I'm sure you can think of your own. The key point I have is to try to invest your medium and high risk picks in a segment you understand well, and in which you can relatively accurately judge risk. If you don't understand anything about how banking works or SWIFT or international settlement layers, don't invest in Stellar. If you have no idea how a supply chain functions, avoid investing in VeChain (even if it's being shilled to death on Reddit at the moment just like XRB was last month).
What's interesting is that often we see like-coin movement, for example when a coin from one segment pumps we will frequently see another similar coin in the same segment go up (think Stellar following after Ripple).
Consider the historic correlations between your holdings. Generally when Bitcoin pumps, altcoins dump but at what rate depends on the coin. When Bitcoin goes sideways we tend to see pumping in altcoins, while when Bitcoin goes down, everything goes down.
You should set price targets for each of your holdings, which is a whole separate discussion I'll go in Part 2 of the guide.

Summing it up

This was meant to get you think about what return targets you should set for your portfolio and how much risk you are willing to take and what strategies you can follow to mitigate that risk.
Returns around 385% (average crypto market CAGR over the last 3 years) would be a good target to aim for while remaining realistic, you can tweak it a bit based on your own risk tolerance. What category of risk your individual crypto picks should be will be determined by how much more greed you have for above average market return. A portfolio of 50% core holdings, 30% medium risk in a sector you understand well and 20% in high risk speculative is probably what the average portfolio should look like, with newbies going more towards 70% core and only 5% high risk speculative.
Just by thinking about these things you'll likely do better than most crypto investors, because most don't think about this stuff, to their own detriment.
submitted by arsonbunny to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Notes from the Hearing Today

Apologies for typos and grammatical errors; wanted to get this out as soon as possible for those that weren't able to watch the live stream. Cleaned up formatting to make it more readable.

While this isn't a 100% word-for-word transcript, the overtone of the meeting should have been conveyed. SEC and CFTC want protections for consumers, but don't want to outright ban crypto. I was under the impression that both agencies were well-educated, but understaffed. They both want to introduce protections for customers and investors and go after scam artists, but don't want to impose any restrictions or regulations that would be bad for crypto as a whole (both from a security perspective, and a technological innovation perspective). Overall a huge positive.

Crapo
Brown
Clayton
Giancarlo
Crapo
Clayton
Giancarlo
Crapo
Clayton
Giancarlo
Crapo
Brown
Clayton
Brown
Clayton
Brown
Clayton
Brown
Clayton
Brown
Clayton
Brown
Clayton
Sen. Shelby
Clayton
Giancarlo
Sen. Shelby
Clayton
Sen. Shelby
Giancarlo
Clayton
Sen. Shelby
Sen Reed
Clayton
Giancarlo
Sen Reed
Giancarlo
Clayton
Sen Reed
Rounds
Clayton
Rounds
Giancarlo
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Perdue
Clayton
Perdue
Giancarlo
Perdue
Clayton
Giancarlo
Donnelly
Giancarlo
Clayton
Donnelly
Giancarlo
Donnelly
Giancarlo
Clayton
Donnelly
Giancarlo
Clayton
Sen. Kennedy
Giancarlo
Sen Kennedy
Giancarlo
Sen Kennedy
Giancarlo
Sen Kennedy
Clayton
Sen Kennedy
Warner
Clayton
Giancarlo
Warner
Clayton
Warner
Giancarlo
Clayton
Cotton
Giancarlo
Clayton
Cotton
Giancarlo
Clayton
Cotton
Clayton
Cotton
Menendez
Giancarlo
Menendez
Giancarlo
Menendez
Giancarlo
Menendez
Clayton
Menendez
Clayton
Moran
Ms. Masto
Clayton
Giancarlo
Ms. Masto
Clayton
Giancarlo
Ms. Masto
Sen Shelby
Clayton
Sen Shelby
Clayton
Giancarlo
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Ms. Warren
Clayton
Crapo
submitted by cembry90 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Anyone monitoring the possibility of a MtGox Bankruptcy Coin Dump?

https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-11-14/bitcoin-bankruptcy-wasn-t-really-a-bust
MtGox has $1.5 Billion USD of Bitcoin that has been locked up in the bankruptcy proceedings since 2014. Any analysis of how a sale of those coins on the market would affect short and long term price? Seems like a lot to me, could be a epic short term dump.
submitted by moYouKnow to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Well explained by Tom Lee about this Selloff

In the past days we've had many posts on why the crypto market is "down" if I can call it that way. Bitcoin futures, cartels, correction, whales, Mt.Gox and other stories. Check Bitcoin futures Volume, it's very low..it can't dump the market, Mt.Gox trustee didn't sell his Bitcoins. And if you compare this year with 2017 we're not DOWN.
January 2017:
Bitcoin 900$
Ethereum 8$
Litecoin 4$
Monero 12$
We're still up, but I feel sorry for the guys that invested on December-January. I know how you're feeling right now, but please HODL it will pay off.
Here's the article from Tom Lee:
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-04-05/crypto-rout-driven-by-25-billion-capital-gain-hit-tom-lee-says
submitted by msdhere to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Bitcoin price looping at Mt. Gox. bitcoin price Mt Gox site disappears, Bitcoin future in doubt 150,000 Mt. Gox Bitcoin won't trigger a correction anytime ... History of MTGOX in one minute The Rise and Fall of Mt. Gox: The World's Largest Bitcoin ...

Nachdem die ehemalige japanische Bitcoin-Börse Mt.Gox 2014 einem angeblichen Hack zum Opfer gefallen ist (Details stehen hier), hat sie kürzlich begonnen, ihren verprellten Kunden ein Online-Entschädigungssystem bereitzustellen. Nachdem dieses zunächst nur für Einzelnutzer galt, hat sie dieses nun auf Firmenkunden ausgeweitet. So verkündete Mt.Gox auf ihrer Website: „Wir freuen uns ... Tokyo-based bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox filed for bankruptcy last week, saying hackers had stolen the equivalent of $460 million from its online coffers. The news rocked the bitcoin world, and it ... The Bitcoin Foundation, an advocacy group for the nascent digital currency, provided information to federal prosecutors this week that aided a probe into Mt. Gox, a shuttered exchange in Tokyo. Mt. Gox, once the world’s largest Bitcoin exchange, filed for bankruptcy in Japan saying about $480 million in Bitcoins belonging to its customers and the firm were missing. Mt. Gox, once the world’s biggest Bitcoin exchange, was sued for fraud by a U.S. customer within hours of filing bankruptcy.

[index] [29988] [44101] [45545] [31239] [17277] [22242] [7092] [721] [15777] [40925]

Bitcoin price looping at Mt. Gox.

6 March 2011 (bitcoin price $0.90) 8 June 2011 (bitcoin price $32) 19 June 2011 (bitcoin price $0.01) 19 Oct 2012 (bitcoin price $11.84) June 20, 2013 (bitcoin price=$111) 7 February 2014 (bitcoin ... bitcoin price Mt Gox site disappears, Bitcoin future in doubt BITCOIN PRICE , BITCOIN FUTURE in doubt http://youtu.be/eO-yrpQpIT8 What is NAMECOIN BITCOIN'S ... MtGox USD to BTC-e Bitcoins in 1 minute This video shows the transfer of MtGox USD funds via the integrated Bitinstant functions of BTC-Trader to the BTC-e exchange and purchase of Bitcoins on BTC ... 150,000 Mt. Gox Bitcoin won't trigger a correction anytime soon #CryptoNews #Bitcoin Our social contact: https://www.instagram.com/cryptonewsandgames/ https:... Blame it on MT.GOX - Duration: 3:54. TheKoziTwo 168,091 views. 3:54. Robert Kiyosaki 2019 - The Speech That Broke The Internet!!! KEEP THEM POOR! - Duration: 10:27. MotivationHub Recommended for ...

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