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Masari: Simple Private Money

Masari (MSR) is a scalability-focused, untraceable, secure, and fungible cryptocurrency using the RingCT protocol. Masari is the first CryptoNote coin to develop uncle mining and a fully client side web wallet.
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Realtime Bitcoin Transactions viewer on Google 3D Globe

submitted by 5tu to BitcoinTechnology [link] [comments]

Noob: Received incorrect amount from GDAX to KuCoin's BTC Wallet

I sent 2.10679394 BTC from GDAX to my KuCoin wallet (18PsEQm6HWNKX16n7HRoKme6MpuLoz6CPJ). I received only 2.02931784 BTC on 2018-03-30. Receiving amount is incorrect. So, I looked up the transaction on Block Cypher: https://live.blockcypher.com/btc/tx/d70dbd30cd20a92426d603066aa13ccb50517488d4e71c8ad68108ba86d60200/ and see that my 2.10680943 BTC was spit into two outputs: 2.02931784 BTC and 0.0774761 BTC.
Do you know why I lost 0.0774761 BTC (bc1qkg7kd8nxdu6lvhd9amj8kgpd5juxq3c436hrl3)? Other BTC address explorer: https://blockchain.info/address/3LoYZM66bREsdgTB1MCuBTFNbCBbpvPAww
On Block Cypher, it says:- Fees: 0.00001549 BTC
Thanks. :)
Edit: Added Screenshots
Coinbase Withdrawal Screen: https://imgur.com/a/F2fWt
Bitcoin Transaction Viewer: https://imgur.com/a/fDDjC
submitted by inducer1911 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Powerful words from Mike Maloney: "I would like to encourage all of your viewers to start using the free market cryptos [like Bitcoin Cash] in transactions...There's a very small window here...Its about how its going to change the world..Its the difference between freedom and enslavement." @14m21s

Powerful words from Mike Maloney: submitted by cryptorebel to btc [link] [comments]

Powerful words from Mike Maloney: "I would like to encourage all of your viewers to start using the free market cryptos [like Bitcoin Cash] in transactions...There's a very small window here...Its about how its going to change the world..Its the difference between freedom and enslavement." @14m21s

Powerful words from Mike Maloney: submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Powerful words from Mike Maloney: "I would like to encourage all of your viewers to start using the free market cryptos [like Bitcoin Cash] in transactions...There's a very small window here...Its about how its going to change the world..Its the difference between freedom and enslavement." @14m21s

Powerful words from Mike Maloney: submitted by cryptoallbot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

transaction appears on insight blockchain viewer but does not appear on blockchain or is incoming on blockchain wallet /r/Bitcoin

transaction appears on insight blockchain viewer but does not appear on blockchain or is incoming on blockchain wallet /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://www.reddit.com/Scams/comments/jij7zf/the_blackmail_email_scam_part_6/
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Cartel scam
You will be threatened by scammers who claim to be affiliated with a cartel. They may send you gory pictures and threaten your life and the lives of your family. Usually the victim will have attempted to contact an escort prior to the scam, but sometimes the scammers target people randomly. If you are targeted by a cartel scam all you need to do is ignore the scammers as their threats are clearly empty.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
Craigslist Carfax/vehicle history scam
You'll encounter a scammer on Craigslist who wants to buy the vehicle you have listed, but they will ask for a VIN report from a random site that they have created and they will expect you to pay for it.
Double dip/recovery scammers
This is a scam aimed at people who have already fallen for a scam previously. Scammers will reach out to the victim and claim to be able to help the victim recover funds they lost in the scam.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam part 5: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5/
PSA: you did not win a giftcard: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/fffmle/psa_you_did_not_win_a_gift_card/
Sugar scams
Sugar scammers operate all over the internet and usually come in two varieties: advance-fee scams where the scammer will ask for a payment from you before sending you lots of money, and fake check style scams where the scammer will either pull a classic fake check scam, or will do a "bill pay" style scam that involves them paying your bills, or them giving you banking information to pay your bills. If you encounter these scammers, report their accounts and move on.
Google Hangouts
Google Hangouts is a messaging platform used extensively by all kinds of scammers. If you are talking with someone online and they want you to switch to Hangouts, they are likely a scammer and you should proceed with caution.
Publishers Clearing House scams
PCH scams are often advance-fee scams, where you will be promised lots of money after you make an initial payment. You will never need to pay if you win money from the real PCH.
Pet scams
You are looking for a specific breed of puppy, bird, or other pet. You come across a nice-looking website that claims to be breeding them and has some available right now - they may even be on sale! The breeders are not local to your area (and may not even list a physical location) but they assure you they can safely ship the pet to you after a deposit or full payment. If you go through with the payment, you will likely be contacted by the "shipper" who will inform you about an unexpected shipping/customs/processing fee required to deliver your new pet. But there was never any pet, both the "breeder" and the "shipper" are scammers, typically operating out of Africa. These sites are rampant and account for a large percentage of online pet seller websites - they typically have a similar layout/template (screenshot - example)
If you are considering buying a pet online, some easy things to check are: (1) The registration date of the domain (if it was created recently it is likely a scam website) (2) Reverse image search the pictures of available pets - you will usually find other scam websites using the same photos. (3) Copy a sentence/section of the text from the "about us" page and put it into google (in quotes) - these scammers often copy large parts of their website's text from other places. (4) Search for the domain name and look for entries on petscams.com or other scam-tracking sites. (5) Strongly consider buying/adopting your pet from a local shelter or breeder where you can see the animal in person before putting any money down.
Thanks to djscsi for this entry.
Fake shipping company scams
These scams usually start when you try to buy something illegal online. You will be scammed for the initial payment, and then you will receive an email from the fake shipping company telling you that you need to pay them some sort of fee or bribe. If you pay this, they will keep trying to scam you with increasingly absurd stories until you stop paying, at which point they will blackmail you. If you are involved in this scam, all you can do is ignore the scammers and move on, and try to dispute your payments if possible.
Chinese Upwork scam
Someone will ask you to create an Upwork or other freelancer site account for them and will offer money in return. You will not be paid, and they want to use the accounts to scam people.
Quickbooks invoice scam
This is a fake check style scam that takes advantage of Quickbooks.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Digit wallet scam
A variation of the fake check scam, the scammer sends you money through a digital wallet (i.e. Venmo, Apple Pay, Zelle, Cash App) along with a message claiming they've sent the money to the wrong person and a request to send the money back. Customer service for these digital wallets may even suggest that you send the money back. However, the money sent is from a stolen credit card and will be removed from your account after a few days. Your transfer is not reversed since it came from your own funds.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

XPUB problems

Okay I have an old xpub that is coming up through ledger live for my bitcoin wallet. When I enter that xpub # to a viewer, it is bringing up only addresses with a 1 and nothing in them.
I see all my addresses in my ledger transaction history on live actually start with a 3.
I remember starting my ledger with a pre-segwit wallet but then switching all my transactions to a new segwit wallet. All these wallet were done with the same private key. Is there anyway to get an accurate xpub that has my segwit wallet address history?? It’s like ledger never saved the segwit xpub and is only reporting the original xpub?
Thanks
submitted by dreftylefty to ledgerwallet [link] [comments]

WaykiChain (WICC) Monthly Report (September 2020)

WaykiChain (WICC) Monthly Report (September 2020)

https://preview.redd.it/nnuhfz6q01t51.png?width=700&format=png&auto=webp&s=15ce35581f2ebad02af140180f5a8b1fe7931f00
Technology & Products
Public Chain Development
· WASM AMPL contract debugging (100%)
· Research on WASM zero-knowledge proof anonymous transfer (50%)
· WASM Sushi contract coding (100%)
· WASM RPC iOS asynchronous library commissioning (100%)
· Verification of the signature push public key algorithm and testing its codability (C++, go) through RPC (100%)
· The new lock-up airdrop contract function: lock-up users can claim the unlocked assets by entering RegID (100%)
· Porting ASWAP contract to public chain 3.0, adding platform fee processing (100%)
· Optimization of Yield Farming contract reward distribution (100%)
· Optimization of Yield Farming contract penalty distribution mechanism (100%)
· Yield Farming contract testing (100%)
· Deployment and initial configuration of WICC and WGRT yield farming contracts and Wayki-X contract completed (100%)
· Ownership of issuance and transfer rights of the bottom-level token ROG transferred to Wayki-X contract (100%)
· The initial generation of ROG completed. 10.08M ROG entered the WICC pool, 2.52M ROG entered the WGRT pool (100%)
· The first 189,000 ROG was minted in Wayki-X contract for rewards by inflation (12.6M × 1.5%) (100%)
· Transfer of 70,000 ROG to AEX for Ecosystem Yield Farming completed (100%)
· WASM developer documentation: added detailed WASM table (Simplified Chinese) (100%)
· WASM developer documentation: added call of multiple contracts and multisignature transactions in WASM contract (Simplified Chinese) (100%)
Application Development
· Yield Farming back end API (100%)
· Yield Farming front end page optimization (100%)
· Yield Farming front end localization (100%)
· Yield Farming pre-release initial API docking (100%)
· Yield Farming application testing (100%)
· Yield Farming application release (100%)
· xUSD & ROG added to Instant in WaykiTimes Android (100%)
· Memory leak issue fixed in Instant in WaykiTimes (100%)
· Data loading error when swiping in Discover fixed in WaykiTimes (100%)
· Data display optimized in Getting Started in WaykiTimes
· UI debugging of several pages in WaykiTimes (100%)
· WaykiTimes 3.0.4 released (100%)
· WaykiTimes Help Center released (100%)
· WaykiTimes Getting Started released (100%)
· WaykiTimes remember password function released (100%)
· WaykiTimes iOS App Store version tested (100%)
· Google crash analysis and testing added to WaykiTimes Android (100%)
· Solved the data loading issue when swiping in Wayki-X Synths (100%)
· Wayki-X price feed delay fixed (100%)
· Amount issue in the plug-in wallet fixed (100%)
· Display error of release contract type of universal transactions fixed on the blockchain explorer (100%)
· WASM contract display specifications for the blockchain explorer completed (100%)
· Development of the Coinbase integration project (wicc-rosetta-api) (85%)
Plan for October
Public Chain Development
· Research on WASM zero-knowledge proof anonymous transfer
· Correction of ASWAP contract proof of liquidity token generation rules
· ASWAP contract testing
· Docking of ASWAP contract with third parties
· Continuous updating of coind RPC interface documentation
Application Development
· Trade — transaction details HTML5 page to native page transfer in WaykiTimes
· Development of the Coinbase integration project (wicc-rosetta-api)
Market
International Market
· On September 4, Russian volunteers opened the second WaykiChain Russian group in Telegram: https://t.me/waykichainrussian.
· On September 6, WaykiChain opened the official community in Discord: https://discord.gg/XyAkqa.
· On September 6, WaykiChain CTO Richard Chen was invited to the Blockchain + Innovative Service and Industrial Application Conference and the China Chamber of International Commerce Blockchain Innovation Service Industry Committee Establishment Conference as a member of the expert group.
· On September 11, the famous US blockchain TV program Exploring the Block tweeted about WaykiChain, showing it is optimistic about the future development of the integrated DeFi ecology of WaykiChain.
· On September 11, the famous business platform Yahoo Finance released WaykiChain project information and announced that WaykiChain CEO Gordon Gao gives an interview to NASDAQ MarketSite’s Jane King on September 12.
· At 7:00 PM EDT on September 12, world’s largest financial channel Bloomberg TV reported that WaykiChain CEO Gordon Gao was interviewed by Jane King of NASDAQ MarketSite. The interview aired on Fox Business Network at 10:30 PM EDT on September 14.
· On September 12, cryptocurrency Twitter account Crypto Catalog tweeted about WaykiChain, showing it is optimistic about the future development of the integrated DeFi ecology of WaykiChain.
· On September 13, DeFi List added WaykiChain governance token WGRT.
· On September 13, WaykiChain reached market cooperation with the Indian blockchain influencer Gmadvice who started to serve as WaykiChain community manager in India.
· On September 16, WaykiChain released “WaykiChain Launches Phoenix Yield Farming with WICC/WGRT Dual-pool for ROG Genesis Issuance” on Twitter. Up to September 21, the news hit 2,400+ retweets.
· On September 17, the cryptocurrency influencer DeFi List retweeted “WaykiChain Launches Phoenix Yield Farming with WICC/WGRT Dual-pool for ROG Genesis Issuance”.
· On September 18, WaykiChain reached strategic market cooperation with the Korean crypto influencer Pantera who will help WaykiChain establish a broad and strong consensus in Korea.
· On September 19, “WaykiChain Dual-pool ROG Yield Farming Korean Group” community established.
· On September 20, the influencer Crypto Wendy retweeted “WaykiChain Launches Phoenix Yield Farming with WICC/WGRT Dual-pool for ROG Genesis Issuance”.
· On September 21, 130+ Korean media outlets published “WaykiChain Launches Phoenix Yield Farming with WICC & WGRT Dual-pool for ROG Genesis Issuance”.
· On September 23, WaykiChain co-founder and CEO Gordon Gao was invited to an AMA session with ICO Pantera Group, Korea’s top Telegram group (stats by u/combot), where he shared his insights into DeFi with 4,000+ Korean users and introduced WaykiChain’s ROG Genesis Yield Farming.
· On September 24, WaykiChain tweeted “ROG Genesis Yield Farming FAQ” and “Leave your question/problem toward WaykiTimes/Wayki-X/ROG Genesis Yield Farming in the Google forms below to share 800 WICC Giveaway!”, the number of engagements is 1,500+.
· On September 24, WaykiChain global partner Vincent Lionheart was invited to an AMA session to D’va Community.
· On September 24, The Business Telegraph, Bitcoin Garden, and other media published “WaykiChain Launches Phoenix Yield Farming with WICC & WGRT Dual-pool”.
· On September 24, WaykiChain tweeted the ROG Genesis Yield Farming Countdown. The news hit 1,000+ retweets.
· On September 25, ROG Genesis Yield Farming news was the day’s hit in Korea with 5,000+ views on Korean cryptocurrency forums.
National Market
· On September 1, CoinTiger listed WaykiChain governance token WGRT and opened the WGRT/USDT pair. WGRT net buy & hold competition started and the CoinTiger community joined a series of WGRT-themed challenges.
· On September 1, WaykiChain governance token WGRT successfully mapped to Ethereum and ERC-20 WGRT was created. The world’s largest DEX Uniswap officially supported it and listed the WGRT/USDT pair.
· On September 2, WaykiChain Strategic Analyst Jing Tao gave the speech “WGRT Dragon, Fly, Tiger, and Leap: Community Governance Upstart” to the MXC community and distributed 3 gold bars to the event participants.
· On September 7, WaykiChain Strategy Analyst Jing Tao attended [This Is Coin Coffee] live DeFi contest co-sponsored by Coinka, fogwu.com, and tuoniaox.com. WEDEX founder & CEO, Loopring co-founder Chen Xiaoliang and ChainNews Research Director Pan Zhixiong joined the event.
· On September 9, Gate.io selected WaykiChain governance token WGRT for the Listing Vote. Each voter had a chance to share an airdrop of 420,875.43 WGRT. WGRT passed the voting with 53,293,775 votes and was successfully listed on Gate.io.
· On September 10, WGRT/USDT trading pair and WGRT withdrawals opened on Gate.io.
· On September 10, WaykiChain released WaykiChain Governance Token WGRT Information and Addresses. The team announced that before July 1, 2021, WGRT circulating supply will be strictly controlled at 10% of the total supply, or 2.1 billion.
· On September 9 to 11, WaykiChain was invited to IoT World China & 5G China along with 400+ exhibitors including Huawei, Baidu, and Tencent. WaykiChain demonstrated the integrated public chain DeFi ecosystem that will help China’s digital construction.
· On September 11, WaykiChain Strategy Analyst Jing Tao was invited to the Bepal community and shared the speech “WaykiChain Governance Token WGRT: Accumulation and Breakout”. WaykiChain airdropped 3,000 WGRT and cash red envelopes to the Bepal community members.
· On September 12, WaykiChain Technology & Development Manager Yuanhang Xiao and Strategy Analyst Jing Tao introduced [New WaykiChain DeFi Product: Decentralized Synthetic Asset Issuance Protocol Wayki-X] in the official WaykiChain yizhibo account. During the live broadcast, WaykiChain distributed pure gold bars and branded gifts to lucky users.
· On September 13, WaykiChain co-founder & CEO Gordon Gao and Overseas Director Qiyuan Mei shared the speech “WaykiChain Opens the Era of Integrated DeFi Public Chains” in the Gate.io live broadcast room. Gate.io CPO Jiuer was the broadcast host. The guests explained WaykiChain’s DeFi strategy and revealed the launch of Yield Farming.
· On September 15, WaykiChain CEO Gordon Gao and BTC38 co-founder Tianwei Huang held the live stream titled “Eight Questions to Explain DeFi Trends and Opportunities” in yizhibo. The hosts analyzed the status and trends of DeFi, discussed DeFi deployment by public chains and exchanges, and new opportunities in synthetic asset trading. WaykiChain distributed pure gold bars and branded gifts to lucky viewers of the stream.
· On September 16, WaykiChain Strategy Analyst Jing Tao shared the speech titled “WaykiChain’s Integrated DeFi Ecosystem Layout” as the guest of btcmoney.cc.
· On September 18, Bying community invited WaykiChain Strategy Analyst Jing Tao to share the speech “New DeFi Opportunity: Phoenix Yield Farming”. WaykiChain held a WICC airdrop for Bying community members.
· On September 18, WaykiChain published the article “No Pre-mining, ICO, or Reserve! WaykiChain Launches Dual-pool Phoenix Yield Farming”.
· On September 19, WaykiChain published the article “Chapter 1. The Financial Innovation of Blockchain Reformation. The Origin, Logic, and Value of WaykiChain ROG” introducing the background of ROG, the operation mechanism of the decentralized synthetic asset system Wayki-X, and the value foundation of ROG in detail.
· On September 23, “No Pre-mining, ICO, or Reserve! WaykiChain ROG Genesis Farming and Early Release Guide” was released across Chinese media.
· On September 24, WaykiChain CEO Gordon Gao, CTO Richard Chen, and CPO Xi Zhang held a joint live stream on yizhibo explaining the future planning of WaykiChain decentralized synthetic asset issuance protocol Wayki-X, ROG, and WaykiChain DeFi in terms of business model, technology, and products. WaykiChain distributed 1 pure gold bar and 6 branded gifts to the lucky stream viewers.
· On September 24, Gate.io and WaykiChain launched the WGRT Investment Competition. The prizes are a BMW G 310 R motorcycle, a 13” MacBook Pro, a 10.2” iPad, 17 pure gold bars and 99,000 WGRT.
· On September 25, various Chinese media released “Wayki-X 101: WaykiChain Decentralized Synthetic Asset Protocol” introducing the functions and mechanism of the decentralized synthetic asset issuance protocol Wayki-X and the value of its token ROG in detail.
· On September 25, WaykiChain launched the “Looking for the Genesis Prophet” community event. The winners received 10 branded gifts.
· On September 25, WaykiChain ROG Genesis Yield Farming launched. WICC and WGRT pool quotas (5 million and 25 million, respectively) were full within just one hour.
· On September 25, WaykiChain reached ecosystem partnership with AEX. AEX became the first platform to join ROG Ecosystem Yield Farming.
· On September 25, WaykiChain partnered with Bying wallet. ROG Genesis Yield Farming is available in Bying wallet.
· On September 26, ROG, the main token of WaykiChain’s decentralized synthetic asset issuance protocol Wayki-X, was listed on AEX. ROG/USDT trading pair is available.
· On September 26, WaykiChain CEO Gordon Gao gave lectures “DeFi Financial Principles and Commercial Applications” and “DeFi Industry Panoramic Scan” at The First Offline Practical Training Camp of Hash Power University, Shanghai Station. Participants included Ontology founder Jun Li, Chainlink Labs — China Head Philip Fei, Digital Renaissance Foundation Managing Director Cao Yin, and Waterdrip Capital founding partner Zheng Yushan.
· On September 28, WaykiChain co-founder and CEO Gordon Gao was a guest at Hash Power Knowledge Base Private Meeting, Shenzhen Station where he shared the speech titled “Feasible Ways of DeFi Application Popularization”. Other guests included Ontology founder Jun Li, DeBank founder and CEO Tang Hongbo, and Huobi Research Chief Technical Researcher Tianyuan Ma.
submitted by Waykichain to WICCProject [link] [comments]

The Role of the TRON Blockchain in Powering the Success of the JSB Foundation

The Role of the TRON Blockchain in Powering the Success of the JSB Foundation
The JSB Foundation has been made possible by the TRON Blockchain
Justin Sun, Born on July 10, 1990, is the man who founded the TRON Blockchain. He is also the current CEO of BitTorrent and a former representative at Ripple Mainland China. Additionally, he is the founder and CEO of Peiwo, a mobile social application in China.
Sun has an MA from the University of Pennsylvania East Asia Studies. He also has a BA in History from Peking University. At 26, Sun was picked by Jack Ma to study at Hupan University and he was the only millennium student amongst the first graduates.
In 2011, Sun was picked as the cover face of Yazhou Zhoukhan and the Davos Global Youth Leaders in 2014. Sun was named the CNTV’s most focused new entrepreneur in 2015 and he was included in the Forbes China 0 under 30 from 2015 to 2017.
The JSB Foundation has been made possible by the TRON Blockchain. Today, TRON is one of the biggest blockchain-based operating systems globally. Some of the key advantages of TRON are:
  • Scalability
High scalability is a key advantage of the TRON blockchain. Many applications are now launching on TRON because of this key advantage. On TRON, users get access to highly efficient and scalable smart contracts. Besides that, the platform is capable of supporting a large number of users and simultaneous transactions without significant lag times.
  • High Availability
Reliability is always a key consideration for any user of a blockchain platform. The platform comes with reliable network architecture, highly reliable user assets, as well as a high level of decentralized consensus. Additionally, the reward distribution system is highly reliable and it helps to promote the growth of the platform.
High Bandwidth
The high throughput on TRON has been achieved by improving the Transaction per Second (TPS) speed. Today, the TPS on TRON is higher than that of Ethereum and Bitcoin. It helps to ensure that TRON is a practical blockchain platform for daily transactions.
A Reliable Wallet
The TRON native wallet is called TronLink. It was first launched on the official website of TRON and it is powered by the TRON platform. The TronLink wallet is the go-to wallet for most users of TRON. It comes as a Chrome Wallet Extension and as an iOS and Android app.
With the wallet, users can send and receive TRX tokens and TRC10 and TRC20 tokens. Besides that, they can integrate smart contracts calls on the developer’s site. Another use case for the wallet is the ability to use DApps within the browser.
Today, the TRON TRX tokens have a market cap that makes it the top 20 global blockchain platforms. The platform launched its ERC20 tokens to the TRON mainnnet on June 25, 2018, which made the TRX tokens an independent coin.

About the JustSwap Platform

JustSwap is a decentralized protocol that will be at the core of the JSB Foundation. The protocol was launched in August 2020 by TRON and is part of a push by TRON to get in on the DeFi action. It aims to create a DeFi platform that will revolve around the TRON blockchain.
The launch of JustSwap was done via a live stream on Yizhibo, the Chinese version of Periscope. During the event, over 763,000 viewers were present. Sun later posted a one-minute video on his YouTube channel explaining JustSwap.
Sun said that JustSwap was an alternative to Uniswap, which is based on the Ethereum blockchain. It will make it possible for traders to trade in TRC20 tokens without paying commissions to the exchange. Besides that, users will be able to earn by providing liquidity on the DEX.
Uniswap, the platform on which JustSwap is based, is the largest protocol in the DeFi space by locked assets. In recent months, the DeFi sector, mainly based on Ethereum, has been growing rapidly. However, Uniswap does not support the TRON blockchain. As a result, users of Uniswap would be locked out of the potential benefits offered by TRON. When JustWap was launched, it achieved trading volumes of $10 million in the first 19 hours.

A Look at the JSBSwap Exchange

JSBSwap is an automated decentralized exchange that is powered by a constant production formula. The entire protocol is powered by smart contracts and secured using the TRON blockchain. The lack of third parties reduces security risks as well as operational costs. It will be one of the main products launched by the JSB Foundation.
The JSB Foundation has collaborated with the P2PB2B exchange for an upcoming launch. The IEO is set to take place on October 15 and it will be open to everyone.
Summary
From the foregoing, it is clear that TRON has the technology and community needed to create a sustainable decentralized platform. It was the reason the JSB Foundation built the platform on the TRON blockchain. The use of TRON will ensure that as JSB grows, it does not face restrictions when it comes to scaling and the speed of transactions.
Combined with a highly motivated team and viable products for the DeFi space, JSB should be quite a success. As the DeFi space continues to expand, more people will want to discover alternatives to existing platforms that offer them value for their funds. JSB has various protocols built to enhance decentralization and value for participants. Its value proposition could help it to become a major success within the DeFi and specifically within TRON.
submitted by jsbfoundation to u/jsbfoundation [link] [comments]

I think I witnessed a Wayfair Bitcoin Transaction Just Now

I think I just witnessed a girl get sold for Bitcoin in a transaction today; and the part number was a blockchain wallet address?
So, the image that came up in the Image Search from Yandex showed that girl in red shorts, and it states the image was 3 hours ago from when i did a screenshot. The transaction I found being two hours ago, meaning that girl could have been offered and then sold for $420k (or 46 bitcoin).
How I got there:
I used the Part Number:
BEC4DFB05F3F4A5090E4882D88732A14
That showed up in Google's Cache:
https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:LpSVRLIE7TQJ:https://www.wayfair.com/furniture/pdx/wfx-utility-samiyah-5-shelf-storage-cabinet-w002983549.html
And this matched a blockchain (transaction?) worth 46 bitcoin (~$420k) using a Yandex search which took place 2 hours ago from writing this (2020-07-11 14:24); again that photo posting only an hour before the transaction occured. I have not read up a bunch on the terminology; I need to, especially if Brock Pierce wins the election.
https://www.blockchain.com/ko/btc/tx/eaa50b379f87e99dd1161962f7905610b4924f31fc0f8af75d7f7a4ec3cac0ce
Edit 1:
BEC4DFB05F3F4A5090E4882D88732A14
Went down a rabbit hole, and came across this nugget.
Went to this search link:
https://yandex.com/images/search?text=src%20ru%20BEC4DFB05F3F4A5090E4882D88732A14&from=tabbar
Saw a picture of a girl in tight clothes, so I clicked that, brought me here:
https://ucrazy.ru/video/1594489754-zalipatelnaya-podborka.html
There is a video there that is an Oddly Satisfying video with random shit in it, but ten minutes in is that same girl, posing; "zalipatelnaya podborka"?
https://youtu.be/MQW0kT1pE1M

Edit 2 :
Something about this YouTube Channel (TRAMBOLINO COMPILATION - which I found from the link in Edit 1)...
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn42HkmbUavCnHhwnvwpl_g
A few of the Oddly Satisfying videos feature women posing for 5 seconds near the tail end of these videos... I hate to say it, but I almost feel like these are girls getting sold / offered out. And they are using these YouTube videos to do it; it wouldn't really raise attention to an innocent viewer; just some random girls nothing provocative.
Edit 3:
Found another video in this format on a random site from another Search.
https://prikol.is/zalipatelnaya-podborka/ - 9:40 in on this one
submitted by kitties-plus-titties to conspiracy [link] [comments]

NKLA resigns

Nikola in the spotlight after founder resigns
Nikola (NASDAQ:NKLA) shares tumbled 30% in premarket trade after founder Trevor Milton stepped down as executive chairman and member of the company's board, adding that he would defend himself against "false allegations leveled by outside detractors." The resignation comes in the wake of claims made by short-seller Hindenburg Research, who described Nikola as a "an intricate fraud built on dozens of lies," as well as reported SEC and DOJ investigations into the company. The news could also spell trouble for General Motors (NYSE:GM), which recently took an 11% stake in Nikola and said it would produce its marquee hydrogen fuel cell electric pickup truck called the Badger. More pain for stocks
Things aren't looking brighter for U.S. equities following Wall Street's third straight weekly decline, with Dow futures down 2.1% and contracts tied to the S&P 500 and Nasdaq off 1.9%. Little progress has been made on a new coronavirus stimulus package as Republicans and Democrats remain at an impasse, while the negotiations could become even more complicated following the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Investors also appear worried that a global recovery could be hampered by a rise in coronavirus infections, especially with no vaccine breakthrough yet.
Oracle deal for TikTok scores Trump's 'blessing'
Oracle (NYSE:ORCL) has reached a deal with China's ByteDance (BDNCE) to host video-sharing app TikTok and take a minority stake in the company along with Walmart (NYSE:WMT). "I have given the deal my blessing,” President Trump declared, adding that new unit TikTok Global would create more than 25,000 new jobs in the U.S. and pay more than $5B in new tax dollars to the Treasury. Meanwhile, Tencent's (OTCPK:TCEHY) WeChat is set to remain operating in the U.S. after a federal judge issued an injunction against Trump's executive order that would have banned the Chinese social media app.
Musk rallies the troops before 'Battery Day'
"We have a shot at a record quarter for vehicle deliveries, but will have to rally hard to achieve it," said Tesla's (NASDAQ:TSLA) Elon Musk in an internal email entitled 'All hands on deck!' Tesla hopes to deliver half a million vehicles in 2020, and has delivered roughly 179,000 through the first half. The letter also comes ahead of the company's annual shareholder meeting tomorrow and its first-ever highly anticipated "Battery Day" for investors.
Energy transition
Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) is jumping on the bandwagon of its European rivals BP (NYSE:BP) and Eni (NYSE:E), which have both announced plans to reduce their focus on oil and gas in the coming decade. Sources tell Reuters that the oil major is looking to slash up to 40% off the cost of producing oil and gas so it can overhaul its business and focus more on renewable energy and power markets. Shell's new cost-cutting review, known internally as Project Reshape and expected to be completed this year, will affect its three main divisions and any savings will come on top of a $4B target set in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis.
HBO outpaces Netflix at the Emmys
HBO (NYSE:T) once again held off Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX) in this year's Emmy race, taking home 30 trophies including 11 for dystopian drama Watchmen, which was the night's biggest winner. HBO's media family saga Succession also had a strong showing, as well as the final season of Schitt's Creek and Disney's (NYSE:DIS) The Mandalorian. The dogfight between HBO and Netflix, which scored 21 wins, is part of a much larger trend in the TV awards circuit: subscription-based platforms are creating more Emmy Award winning content.
Suspicious transactions
Deutsche Bank (NYSE:DB) appears to have facilitated more than half of the leaked $2T of suspicious transactions that were flagged to the U.S. government over nearly two decades, according to Deutsche Welle, though the lender said the incidents "have already been investigated and led to regulatory resolutions." Shares of HSBC (NYSE:HSBC) and Standard Chartered (OTCPK:SCBFF) fell on the suspicious fund movement, as well as JPMorgan (NYSE:JPM), BNY Mellon (NYSE:BK) and Barclays (NYSE:BCS), which were also named in the report. Financial firms are required by law to alert FinCEN (the U.S. Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network) when they detect activities like money laundering and sanctions violations, though such filings are not necessarily evidence of criminal misconduct. DB -8% premarket.
What else is happening...
Garrett Motion (NYSE:GTX) files for bankruptcy with $2.1B KPS offer.
Walmart (WMT) widens fashion focus with new private clothing label.
Different efficacy bars in Moderna (NASDAQ:MRNA) and Pfizer (NYSE:PFE) COVID-19 trials.
Movies still face Catch-22, needing both viewers and blockbusters to return.
United (NASDAQ:UAL) the latest airline to press for more relief.
Today's Markets
In Asia, Japan +0.2%. Hong Kong -2.1%. China -0.6%. India -2.1%. In Europe, at midday, London -3.4%. Paris -3.2%. Frankfurt -3.2%. Futures at 6:20, Dow -2.1%. S&P -1.9%. Nasdaq -1.9%. Crude -2.3% to $40.37. Gold -1.3% to $1937.60. Bitcoin -2.1% to $10734. Ten-year Treasury Yield -3 bps to 0.66%
Today's Economic Calendar
8:30 Chicago Fed National Activity Index 6:00 PM Fed's Williams Speech 6:00 PM Fed's Kaplan Speech
submitted by upbstock to Optionmillionaires [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5//
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a discount. The scammer will have an excuse as to why the price is so low. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

FORSAGE – BIG SPECIAL EVENT: Johnathan McClain

FORSAGE – BIG SPECIAL EVENT: Johnathan McClain

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A week ago one of the most anticipated events of August took place on the official FORSAGE YouTube channel: FORSAGE – BIG SPECIAL EVENT. The leading Forsage.io speakers have shared their knowledge with the viewers, and shed some light on the future development plans of the project.
Today we would like to publish the transcripts, and remind you that you can always watch the event on the official channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/FORSAGEOfficial
Johnathan McClain

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Motion. Without motion there is no development. Every stage of humanity's development has always hinged on two factors: the first being new tools, and the second – the skill of putting them to use. This was the case with the wheel, electricity, and even fast food. Today we find ourselves in the digital era, and we are now only beginning to understand the scope of opportunity these technologies offer. Today you will see something you have never seen before.
We will tell you about the Forsage platform. Why does it have over 800,000 registered users in just four months? How is it that the platform capitalization exceeds 200,000,000 dollars?
Above all else, Forsage is an opportunity, it’s a tool available to everyone. It is this tool we are going to talk about today, during our first special event. You will see with your own eyes how to apply these tools, and the new opportunities they bring. My name is Jonathan McClain, I am a member of the Forsage community, and I am glad you joined me to take a look beyond this door.
The year is 2020, this year we got to see unprecedented events unfold, we got to feel what it means to be caught in a truly global event. Globalization unhinged. The world is changing, and so are we. We have to adapt, grow and learn how to be in the world. How to treat each other and the environment around us. We have reevaluated the importance of human warmth and support. We now have a clear understanding that the world will not return to what it used to be — and it’s fine.
What we have to do is learn from our mistakes, and make the right conclusions. We now see that results are what we achieve together. It is only possible if each and every one of us puts in the effort. All this is achievable only when every community member believes, follows and respects the rules and principles that underpin the community. The first thing we will talk to you about is the code of Forsage.
At the core of the code are principles from the declaration of human rights, principles of non-violence, liberty, equality and unity, where fairness and transparency are the cornerstone that supports this strong and healthy community. The future where every one of us is happy and free. I believe that we are all people of merit who will by example lead the way into a better world.
The Forsage code is available for everyone to download starting now. The success of every idea relies on the community, which also becomes the main measure of success: its spirit, unity and actions. It is only recently that we began actively communicating with each other, began both listening and engaging in a dialogue, and what has come out of it you will see on the screen right now.
Now, I have a question for you. Would you like to earn a living freely? Would you like to receive the fruit of your labour the moment you earn it, without waiting for the reward for weeks, months, years? Would you like to have an opportunity to help others around you while you’re helping yourself? Sounds like a dream? But it’s real.
Inside the brand book you will find absolutely everything you may need: templates, ready-made solutions, fonts, and a host of other things to boot. The best thing about it is that the Brand Book and all the other brand style elements will be available for download on the official website at FORSAGE.io in your dashboard totally free of charge.
Thanks to our financial technology experts, we have managed to create our own crypto – fiat bank. Another thing I would like to present to you is a crypto-fiat bank card by FORSAGE. Now you can spend the money you have earned right away. No need to transfer, exchange, or do anything with some third-party websites or organizations. Everything is here. Simply transfer any of the four cryptocoins to your card: it can be Bitcoin, it can be Ethereum, or USDT, or Tron. You can always top up via SEPA and SWIFT transfers. This way you become independent from banks, and those who are watching your transactions. Use your money right away.
submitted by Forsage_io to u/Forsage_io [link] [comments]

morning joe

Microsoft is committed to trying to buy TikTok's U.S. operations, after CEO Satya Nadella discussed a potential deal during a phone call on Sunday with President Trump. Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) said in a blog post that it will move quickly to pursue discussions with TikTok parent ByteDance (BDNCE), aiming to complete negotiations by Sept. 15. "Microsoft fully appreciates the importance of addressing the President’s concerns," the company said. "It is committed to acquiring TikTok subject to a complete security review and providing proper economic benefits to the United States, including the United States Treasury." The company's aim is to build on TikTok's popular user experience with adding privacy and security protections. The proposed transaction has gained the blessing of top Trump administration officials, including Treasury Secretary Mnuchin, as well as several Republican lawmakers, after the president's Friday night comments that he preferred a TikTok ban in the U.S. instead of a sale took all sides by surprise.
All eyes on U.S. payroll data
The U.S. July employment report, to be released this Friday, will have a binary flavor to it. If the jobs situation is consistent with economists' views, it should give investors more confidence in the economy's health while weak data will weigh on investors' near-term enthusiasm. Current consensus is a rise of 1.65M jobs, albeit a bearish drop of ~27% from last Thursday's projection of 2.25M. Congress is trying to cobble together another stimulus package but, unsurprisingly, Republicans and Democrats are at loggerheads over the specifics.
MLB draws strong TV ratings in opening week
Despite concerns over a truncated 60-game season and empty seats in stadiums, Major League Baseball's opening week has been a resounding success. Games aired nationally during opening weekend (July 23-26) drew more than twice as many viewers as a year ago. Walt Disney's (NYSE:DIS) ESPN said that its first 12 broadcasted games averaged ~1.2M viewers, up 34% compared to last year. Fox Sports (NASDAQ:FOX) also enjoyed a double-digit rise in ratings. According to Michael Mulvihill, Fox Sports head of strategy and analytics, the strong start reflects pent-up demand and little competition from other major U.S. sports. The season, though, is facing its first stern test after 18 members of the Miami Marlins tested positive for COVID-19 leading to the cancellations of certain games by several clubs. 17 games have been postponed to date.
Fed to "relax" approach to managing inflation target
The Fed is preparing to abandon its long-held practice of raising interest rates to preempt overheating in the economy, citing persistently low U.S. inflation. Chairman Jerome Powell hinted at the shift in a news conference last week when he disclosed that the central bank would soon complete a comprehensive review of its policy-making strategy. The change is unlikely to alter much since interest rates are barely above zero and are expected to remain low for the foreseeable future. Longer term, central bankers, economists and investors expect rates to return to a more normal 4% or so once the economic recovery/expansion has matured.
Trump readies action against Chinese software firms
During an interview yesterday on Fox News' Sunday Morning Futures, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that President Trump will announce new action this week against Chinese software companies that he perceives are threats to national security, including TikTok and WeChat that, he says, are "feeding data directly to the Chinese Communist Party." In a separate interview, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin declared that "we are not keeping TikTok in its current form." The expected actions will be the latest salvo in the deterioration in U.S./Sino relations.
Apple sued in China over voice assistant patent
Shanghai Zhizhen Network Technology Company, known as Xiao-i, has filed a lawsuit in a Shanghai court against Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) claiming infringement on a patent covering a voice assistant similar to Siri. The company seeks 10B yuan ($1.43B) in damages and, if successful, could prevent the tech giant from selling many of its products in China. In late June, China's Supreme Court ruled that Xiao-i owns the patent which ended a process that involved several trials since 2012. It is the third time in less than a decade that Apple has faced trademark and patent challenges in its #2 market (behind the U.S.). The company has yet to comment on the matter.
U.S. COVID-19 pandemic in new "widespread" phase
According to White House coronavirus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx, the pandemic is in a "new phase" that is different from the March/April period with "extraordinarily widespread" cases in both urban and rural areas. Reemphasizing the essential role of wearing masks and distancing, Dr. Birx said, "To everybody who lives in a rural area, you are not immune or protected from this virus and that is why we keep saying, no matter where you live in America, you need to wear a mask and socially distance, do the personal hygiene pieces." She also says super-spreading events are the main concern, not super-spreading individuals. Per Johns Hopkins case tracker, U.S. infections are now over 4.6M with over 154K deaths.
GOP and Dems tussle over fourth round of U.S. stimulus
Talks between Republican and Democratic leaders over the specifics of the latest round, the fourth, of economic stimulus are proceeding down the familiar contentious path. Both sides agree on sending $1,200 checks to most Americans but the GOP is apparently balking at a boost to unemployment insurance which was set at $600 per week but recently lapsed. Democrats want to preserve the $600 amount while Republicans want to cut it to $200 due to cost concerns. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is accusing President Trump of standing in the way of a deal. On Face the Nation yesterday, Chief of Staff Mark Meadows said, "I'm not optimistic that there will be a solution in the very near term."
7-Eleven to acquire Speedway for $21B in cash
Seven & i Holdings (OTCPK:SVNDF) indirect subsidiary 7-Eleven has agreed to acquire Speedway from certain subsidiaries of Marathon Petroleum (NYSE:MPC) for $21B in cash. The Enon, Ohio-based chain operates ~3900 convenience stores in 36 U.S. states. The transaction, which includes a 15-year fuel supply agreement for about 7.7B gallons per year, should close in Q1 2021.
China's Caixin manufacturing PMI hits nine-plus year high
The Caixin China manufacturing purchasing managers index hit its highest point since 2011, lending more credence to inklings of a recovery there. China's official PMI rose to its own four-month high last week, and it's got a bigger sample, focused on larger state-owned companies. Caixin focuses on smaller manufacturers, and it hit 52.8, the third straight month it was over 50, signaling expansion.
Rio Tinto sues Australia's Monadelphous over 2019 fire
Rio Tinto (NYSE:RIO) has sued Monadelphous Engineering Associates (OTCPK:MOPHY) over a fire at Rio's Western Australia iron ore processing facility last year. Monadelphous says Rio is claiming MEA breached terms of a contract, and that Rio is seeking A$493M (about $351M) tied to its inability to process iron ore at the plant during repairs.
What else is happening...
Siemens Healthineers (OTC:SEMHF) merges with Varian Medical Systems (NYSE:VAR) in $16B deal.
SpaceX (SPACE) and NASA splashdown breaks 45-year drought.
Blackstone (NYSE:BX), TPG rejigger REIT debt to sidestep margin calls.
Iran stock market hits record high despite sanctions and battered economy.
Today's Markets In Asia, Japan +2.24%. Hong Kong -0.56%. China +1.75%. India -1.64%. In Europe, at midday, London +0.56%. Paris +0.97%. Frankfurt +1.86%. Futures at 6:20, Dow -0.05%. S&P +0.10%. Nasdaq +0.52%. Crude -1.32% to $39.74. Gold +0.02% to $1,986.30. Bitcoin -0.75% to $11,164. Ten-year Treasury Yield +1.3bps to 0.549%
Today's Economic Calendar 9:45 PMI Manufacturing Index 10:00 ISM Manufacturing Index
submitted by upbstock to Optionmillionaires [link] [comments]

Scam posing as Joe Rogan and Shroud

This is my first post here but i felt i had to post to bring awareness to it. A few days ago i noticed a Rogan stream on my Youtube page with almost 70k viewers so i checked it out but it wasn't from his official page and it was linking to this site which is now empty. It was a bitcoin scam claiming to double the bitcoin you send to the address and the page was filled with fake transactions but the really clever thing was that it was playing an old episode with Andreas Antonopoulos who is a bitcoin expert and to a new viewer the whole thing would seem legit.
Just this morning I saw a similar thing on Twitch with a famous streamer Shroud, the same MO it was playing an old stream from him and linking to a fake "skin" site which i believe is a phishing link to get people to give their Steam details under the pretense of free CSGO skins. Shroud was streaming with another site until a couple of days ago so it would seem somewhat plausible that he would do some kind of "giveaway" on his return to Twitch.
Both these scams had the same video layout and both comment sections were filled with fake success comments and the scam seems very sophisticated as it uses view bots,fake comments and even just the knowledge to use a bitcoin expert on the fake JRE steam etc . I'm not sure if the this is the right place to post it but i wanted to post this somewhere. I've linked to all the relevant info that is still up (sorry in advance if this is breaking some kind of rule)
https://www.twitch.tv/shroudzbzb
https://brookdrop.fun/store.steampowered.com/login (phising link don't enter details)
https://gyazo.com/b287734a404c3b1c9662d29c453ae2f9
https://btc-rogan.info/ (now empty)
Small update: The Shroud stream mysteriously went from 7k viewers to single digits and no one typing in the chat in the space of a few minutes.
submitted by Daniel10212 to Scams [link] [comments]

I lost all my BTC in a recent scam.

I lost all my BTC in a recent scam.
I can’t believe I'm telling this story. I'm still dealing with it. Please understand how stupid I really feel, right now.
Last night(Tuesday 5ish PM CST) I was the victim of an online scam/ phishing attack. It is very embarrassing to admit this but perhaps it’ll help someone else. Perhaps it will enlighten YouTube to any vulnerabilities as well as enlighten Norton security software; the security I use on my browser.
I never thought that I’d be telling this story right now. Im still not over it. This was savings and it's all gone.
This scheme waaaas sly. And sneaky. Again, I’m rather online security conscious but it just wasn’t enough. My guard was down. My gullibility up.
It was a high ranking #YouTube video with “thousands of viewers” of a talk with the Winklevoss twins. There was a link that took me to what I thought was the Gemini exchange promo site. An exchange I’ve considered using before.

https://preview.redd.it/4q6g5blpmw951.png?width=2491&format=png&auto=webp&s=7dd1e1ce6a474ed981d18f73569666016757fdd0
In hindsight - like most things - yes, it seems crazy to have fallen for this, but I thought I had good measures in place to prevent me from even visiting a scam or phishing site. The Norton browser extension has kept me from visiting malicious sites of this nature before but not this time. I was reeled in like a stupid fish
Given that it was the end of my work day I was a bit mentally tired, which again is why I rely on some sort of protection from #Norton at times.
The logic was that they were bringing awareness to bitcoin usage and were doing a give away in BTC via transactions. I thought that “they’re wealthy enough to do something like this. I’ve done other things similar to this before and received free promo bitcoin”. Also, the BTC address itself had "Gemini" in it. I know.... I know....

https://preview.redd.it/0cleesxrmw951.png?width=2463&format=png&auto=webp&s=9929c7fb4e7826b1e9975b49f6715390716125db
Yes, I feel like an idiot.
At one point I clicked on this “if you don't see your transaction click here” and it took me to a site in Russian . This was the moment that I realized that I'd been had. It was an awful moment.
Here is the transaction on the blockchain: https://blockchair.com/bitcoin/transaction/da1c9a3e6ecd8b9e714ab62a2fe166b10984c43d5e14a915ee8a0ba967158e78
Verify verify verify these things!!!
A quick message to the/all scammers:
I don't know your situation. Nor do you know mine. Most of us in America are not the #$%$ who run this country. Most of us do not like or trust those who run the U.S. Gov. We - like you - are normal people navigating our way through this corrupt, brutal, greedy country. Don’t be so narrow minded to think that ALL Americans are fat, loud, greedy, mean and rude murderers. I / we are not our “leaders”. Steal from them. Not us.
I don't expect this to change anything, at all, but in the case the people behind this have an ounce of remorse here is the new Exodus Wallet address the BTC came from: bc1q3x2s7a3a0p23cye73g9mth2nyhrm2z2gqvqv3k

Thank you for taking the time to read this. I'm going to go throw up now.
submitted by OhTheFuture to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://reddit.com/Scams/comments/dohaea/the_blackmail_email_scam_part_4/
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a discount. The scammer will have an excuse as to why the price is so low. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

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